Unnecessary Suffering

My flesh to you is unnecessary,

And my milk’s unnecessary for you,

So if none of these is necessary

Then my suffering’s unnecessary too.

******************

Raystede Centre for Animal Welfare‘s governing document states:

1.1 The objects of the charity are
(1) To prevent and relieve cruelty to animals and to protect them from UNNECESSARY SUFFERING and to promote and encourage a knowledge and love of animals and of their proper care and treatment.

and yet they serve meat, fish, dairy and eggs in their cafe.

Tell them they’re breaking their own laws!

Raystede Centre for Animal Welfare,
The Broyle, Ringmer,
East Sussex,
BN8 5AJ
Tel: (01825) 840252
info@raystede.org

And don’t forget to sign and share the petition ūüėÄ

Thank you ūüôā

 

Quick! The animals need you!

If you’re a UK resident, Compassion in World Farming needs your help.

By current European law, animals are recognised as sentient beings, acknowledging their ability to feel pain, suffer and also experience joy. No one who has seen a cow going outside for the first time after a winter indoors, a hen dust bathing, or a pig wallowing in a fresh patch of mud would disagree with that. The law says that as animals are sentient beings, full regard must be given to their welfare when creating new legislation or regulations.

Securing this status for animals was a massive step forward for animal welfare in 1997.  It was the biggest campaign Compassion has ever run.  The recognition of animals as complex and intelligent creatures has been the cornerstone of European animal welfare legislation since that time, and the basis for so much of the progress we have made together.

But now, there’s Brexit!

The Repeal Bill, which moves all European law into UK law once we leave the EU, has left out this important protection. It is completely absent; both the recognition of animals as sentient beings, and the requirement for governments to pay ‚Äúfull regard‚ÄĚ to their welfare.

Once the UK leaves the EU, we cannot be sure that future Governments will still treat animals as sentient beings.

Please demand that the clause is brought into UK law.

This could be a disaster for animal welfare. We cannot let this happen.

Please sign this petition calling on Michael Gove to take urgent action.

You can find out more about the problem here.

And more about the technical details of the change in legislation here.

Thank you.

Animal Sanctuary Poem Week: Day 4

Hillside Animal Sanctuary

Frettenham, Norfolk

Wendy Valentine’s amazing

Her firey compassion don’t stop blazing.

Her sanct’ry is home to many a horse,

It goes without saying, she’s vegan of course!

There’s chickens and ducks and budgies and turkeys,

And sheep and cows and llamas and donkeys.

There’s rabbits and emus, alpacas and deer,

There’s even some chipmunks and goats live here.

But rescuing’s not all that Hillside does,

They also investigate farms because

They need to make public the horror that’s hidden

Behind the farm gates of those animal prisons.

‚̧ ūüôā ‚̧

Hillside is now home to over 3000 animals¬†and is one¬†of the UK’s most successful campaigning organisations for the animals’ cause. ¬†They have always known that one of the main reasons animals are left to suffer in factory farms is because people have little or no idea about the immense cruelty involved in their food production.

Miss Mabel Raymonde-Hawkins

This wonderful woman, who sadly died in 1998, was a life-long advocate for animals.¬† She writes in her book Sensible Pets and Silly People, referring to activities with her childhood friend when she was 5 years old: “… I do not think there was any crime we would not commit for an animal.¬† We were always prepared to do anything we could to reduce the sufferings of any animals that came our way …”¬† She went on to¬†found Raystede Centre for Animal Welfare¬†, in the 1950s I believe,¬†and tirelessly continued as she had begun – saving all the animals who needed her.

The day she died was a great tragedy for animals because those left in charge of Raystede have betrayed her legacy by serving meat, fish, eggs and dairy in their café Рsomething she would never have allowed.  How do I know that?  Read this (another excerpt from her book):

“Too often our entertainment, our food, our clothing and so-called sport are all at the expense of animals and a civilised society in years to come will look back with horror at the way that we have exploited animals …. Things have gone wrong.¬† Things have got worse.¬† The sparrows go on falling.¬† The sheep go on suffering and it is time many more of us did much more about it … We must be less cautious, we must forge ahead with less timidity and decide that all cruelty should be punished and eliminated. …. Those of us who have grown old in the work and who have so little to encourage us for the future welfare of animals can at least hope that having carried the banner so far, we can, in falling, fling it to the hosts behind to carry on the work and hope that they will be more successful than we have been during this century.”

Heartbreakingly the hosts behind have dropped the banner and let her down horribly.

How dare they?¬† How dare they betray her life’s work?¬† How dare they betray the animals?¬† How dare they do it in Raystede’s name?

Every time someone signs the petition to make Raystede’s caf√© vegan, the CEO, Nigel Mason gets an email.¬† Get everyone you know, and everyone you don’t know to sign it.¬† Even better, write to the president (who worked there when Miss Raymonde-Hawkins was there incidentally) and tell him what you think of their betrayal.¬† Tell him to make that caf√© vegan!¬† I know I can count on you.¬† Thank you ‚̧

Raystede’s President:

Morgan Williams,
29 Hamilton Court,
The Strand,
Brighton Marina Village,
Brighton,
East Sussex,
BN2 5XD

 

Snow White and Rose Red remembered.

children's story

Once upon a time there were two beautiful girls called Snow White and Rose Red.  They were very unhappy because they were imprisoned in a large windowless shed with thousands of others like them.  They were cramped and miserable; they never saw daylight or felt the wind on their faces;  and the prison guards were rough and cruel.  Then one night, everything changed.

children's story

As the wind blew and the rain poured down, someone came and lifted them out of their prison and carried them out into the night.

children's story

The beautiful girls were scared at first. ¬†They tried to shelter their heads from the wind and rain, instinctively ducking under the chin of the person carrying them. ¬†What was this cold, dark, wet outside world? ¬†They had never seen it before and didn’t know what to think.

children's story

After hours and hours of jostling and jolting in the wind and rain; after feeling cold and wet and very very nervous; they arrived somewhere.  Somewhere new.  Somewhere unfamiliar.

children's story

They explored with care. ¬†They didn’t know what to make of it. ¬†They didn’t know who to trust. ¬†But they were curious. ¬†They weren’t so desperate to get away anymore. ¬†They started to wonder if this was, after all, something good.

children's story

As they settled in to their new surroundings they were approached by other individuals.  One of whom in particular, Mrs Teapot, became their devoted friend.

children's story

children's story

children's story

children's story

And so they lived happily ever after ūüėÄ